COVER REVEAL! Punch by Barbara Henderson

GO! It’s out there in the big wide world!

What do you think?

paisleypiranha

We’re delighted to reveal the cover of Barbara Henderson’s book ‘Punch’, her second with Cranachan Publishing. Isn’t it fab? The book will be out 23rd October 2017.

PUNCH EBOOK COVER FINAL (5)THE MARKET’s on FIRE. FIRE! FIRE! The BOY DID IT!’

Smoke belches out through the market entrance.

And me?

I turn and run.

When 12 year-old Phineas is accused of a terrible crime, his only option is to flee. In the unlikely company of an escaped prisoner and a group of travelling entertainers, he enters a new world of Punch and Judy shows and dancing bears. But will Phineas clear his name? And what can he do when memories of a darker, more terrible crime begin to haunt him?

The Author says:

When Anne Glennie, Director of Cranachan Publishing, said that this time, the cover needed a proper illustrator, I was really excited. I had been so happy with the much commented-on, striking…

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#Punch Cover Reveal: Steady…

Tomorrow, Friday, is the big reveal on the Paisley Piranha blog. The Punch cover has been a while in coming, mainly because we wanted to get it right. 

I thought I’d make the next clue about the process.

The ideas for the design came together quickly, but it’s fair to say that some of the practical solutions were found in unexpected places… 

Here is another wee clue, to keep you guys on your toes:

Can’t wait for you ALL TO SEE THE COVER!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can’t wait for the world to see the cover tomorrow!

#Punch Cover Reveal: Ready…

The week of the PUNCH cover reveal has finally arrived: On Friday 25th August, the wonderful Paisley Piranhas are going to throw the image out into the big bad world. It had to feel classic and timeless at the same time: the perpetual challenge for historical fiction, and particularly so with children’s books.

THE MARKET’s on FIRE. FIRE! FIRE! The BOY DID IT!’
Smoke belches out through the market entrance.
And me?
I turn and run.
When 12 year-old Phineas is accused of a terrible crime, his only option is to flee. In the unlikely company of an escaped prisoner and a group of travelling entertainers, he enters a new world of Punch and Judy shows and dancing bears. But will Phineas clear his name? And what can he do when memories of a darker, more terrible crime begin to haunt him?

What do you think the cover of this type of story should feature?

I’ll give you  wee hint: it shares a colour scheme (and theme) with this: Image result for red white yellow orange black

(* no product endorsement, obviously)

Get guessing!

Edinburgh Book Festival: A love letter from Barbara Henderson @edbookfest @scattyscribbler @cranachanbooks

Thanks to Joanne from Portobello Book Blog for featuring me on her blog today. Find out what it was like to attend EIBF as a published author for the first time. 🙂

Portobello Book Blog

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I’m delighted to have Barbara Henderson with me today. I met up with Barbara at a gathering of authors and bloggers at the Edinburgh Book Festival and as usual, she had a big smile on her face. That’s her at the back with the lovely blue scarf on. As she explains in this guest post, this year more than ever she had a very good reason for that smile!

Edinburgh International Book Festival: A love letter

WP_20170812_07_53_18_Pro View from the train en route to Edinburgh

Edinburgh International Book Festival has been a fixture in my life for nigh-on a decade.

What’s not to love? It’s an excuse to visit the fantastic city where I spent many happy student years! Where I met my husband, had my first child and the setting of countless happy memories. Over the years, popping down the A9 to EIBF was a great way of sharing our…

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Merryn Glover’s India Books for Kids

When an author I greatly admire, Merryn Glover, talked about putting together a blog tour around the anniversary of the India/Pakistan partition, I jumped at the chance to be part of it. Some first hand recommendations of India books for kids? Yes please! Here is what she says:

I grew up in Nepal, India and Pakistan, so it was always important to me that my children – brought up in Scotland – had an understanding of that part of the world.  Along with my memories, photos, films and two special visits, I shared my love for those countries through books.  As August 15th this year marks the 70th Anniversary of India’s Independence, Barbara suggested I write a post about my favourite India books for kids and teens.  There are squillions of great titles out there, but these are the much-enjoyed books still on our shelves and available in the UK.  Listed roughly in order of reading age.

 

Image result for mangoes and bananas bookMangoes & Bananas, The Sacred Banana Leaf & The Great Race: Nathan Kumar Scott

Nathan Kumar Scott (http://www.nathankumarscott.com/my-books) is an old school friend who has written a series of picture books based on Indian folk tales, each title drawing from a different form of folk art.  The results are exquisite books with enchanting stories.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mangoes-Bananas-Nathan-Kumar-Scott/dp/8186211063/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1501848817&sr=1-3&keywords=nathan+kumar+scott

 

Image result for One grain of riceOne Grain of Rice: Demi

This book was a gift to my sons from a former teacher of mine and is sub-titled “A Mathematical Folktale”.  It’s an adaptation of a traditional Indian story that uses a girl’s clever plan to explore both maths and morals.  It’s also beautifully illustrated in a style drawn from Moghul art.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/One-Grain-Rice-Mathematical-1997-03-01/dp/B01K13KL6I/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1501847985&sr=1-1&keywords=one+grain+of+rice

 

Ancient Civilisations – Indian Myths: Shahrukh Husain & Bee Willey  This is a collection of tales from India’s rich store of mythology with vivid pictures and a helpful glossary.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Indian-Myths-Stories-Ancient-Civilisations/dp/0237533766

 

Indian Tales, A Barefoot Collection: Shenaaz Nanji & Christopher Corr  “The trip of a lifetime!” the book announces and so it is, with brightly coloured maps, stories and information from eight regions in India and a long list of sources at the back.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Indian-Tales-Collection-Shenaaz-Nanji/dp/1846860822/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1501848238&sr=1-1&keywords=indian+tales+barefoot+collection

Image result for Amazon the jungle books by rudyard kiplingThe Jungle Books: Rudyard Kipling – We all know the wonderful Disney film, but how many of us have ventured with Mowgli and his animal friends through the pages of Kipling’s books?  I can guarantee a wild time!

https://www.amazon.co.uk/d/Books/Jungle-Rudyard-Kipling/1856132536/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1501848677&sr=1-4&keywords=the+jungle+book

 

The Village by the Sea, Anita Desai  I taught this poignant story of poverty and courage to my S1 English class in India many moons ago and fell in love with it.  By a Booker prize-winning author, it is strong writing that will draw readers close to the characters and the dilemmas of their lives.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/d/Books/Village-Sea-Puffin-Anita-Desai/0141359765/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1501848616&sr=1-1&keywords=village+by+the+sea

 

The Wheel of Surya, Jamila Gavin This is the first of a trilogy that begins with a brother and sister in India when their lives are splintered by Partition in 1947 and they end up on a boat to England.  I read it to my sons on a visit to India when they were 12 and 10, and we were captivated.  The other books in the series are The Eye of the Horse and The Track of the Wind

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Wheel-Surya-Trilogy-Jamila-Gavin/dp/0749747447/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1501848901&sr=1-1&keywords=the+wheel+of+surya

 

Malgudi Days, R K Narayan  I first discovered this glorious little collection of stories when I taught S4 pupils in Kathmandu and have returned to it many times since.  Short and deceptively simple, they are full of wisdom, humour and deep humanity.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Malgudi-Days-Astrologers-Lawleyroad-Classics/dp/0143039652/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1501848739&sr=1-1&keywords=R+K+Narayan+Malgudi+Days

 

Narayan said of India that ‘the writer has only to look out of the window to pick up a character and thereby a story.’  Which is good news for us, as we need only to dip into one of the many brilliant books from India to meet those characters and enter their stories.  Join me there!

 

Image result for a house called askival

Merryn Glover is a writer of fiction and plays with work widely anthologised and broadcast  on Radio Scotland and Radio 4.  She has also worked as an English, drama and dance teacher and currently spends two days a week in a high school library, loving the magic of bringing books and kids together. 

Her novel for adults (and intelligent older teens), A House Called Askival, is set in north India and spans 70 years of history, including the cataclysmic events of Independence and Partition.

Links: A House Called Askival http://www.merrynglover.com/askival-2/

Website www.merrynglover.com

On the Ride again (5): That’s a WRAP!

Recording a book trailer in a single day was always ambitious.

Recording a book trailer in a single day when it rains solidly for about eight hours – now that might be a problem.

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I picked up film guru Ross in the morning, and hopefully we headed off north to Strathpeffer – not only a lovely Victorian-looking place, but crucially, with a drier forecast. Alas, not with much luck. The buildings were grand, right enough, but not close enough together to create the impression of 1889 Inverness. On top of that, my previously willing talent had become a little self-conscious about walking and running around in the Victorian gear we’d borrowed from the theatre. We did many u-turns, reversed our way out of corners, drove along this street and that, before finally admitting the game was a bogey. Back to Inverness we went without a single shot in the can.

To our dismay, it still rained enthusiastically in my home town and the setting of the book’s opening chapters. Time for a reboot. The talent (my son) got changed into less conspicuous gear and we headed out for lunch. Amazing what a bowl of soup can do for the dejected spirit – by the time we left for the museum at 2pm, the whole thing seemed tight, but almost possible again. We arrived early. The talent got changed and emerged a little reluctantly into the tourist-path between Inverness Castle and the town. Twenty minutes of scrambling up castle hill through long grass in boots way too big for him yielded our first usable footage. Ross the camera guru was beginning to smile.

Screen Shot 2017-07-08 at 18.29.07 (2)
Before…
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And after darkening the shot

Into the museum for our appointment with the Victorian Punch and Judy puppets it was. I felt a Tony Blair quote coming on (oh dear!): I feel the hand up history upon my shoulder…

Handling and filming the very puppets with which the Morrison family had entertained Highland audiences for over a hundred years (from Victorian times), now that’s a privilege you don’t get every day. I had a fan-girl moment. I apologise for the completely unhinged grin in this picture. I have no excuse, I was carried away by the moment.

Barbara Punch puppet pic
The Museum’s Mr Punch puppet

We emerged, feeling the need to celebrate with hot chocolate and churros. That done, we took a trip to my house which wasn’t far away: We needed my main character to witness a huge fire from the top of a tree.

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The talent, crouching in the fir tree in our garden, ready to get into character… He doesn’t look very terrified to me.

My bright idea of playing flames footage on a laptop and holding it in front of his face was only partially successful. We even tried to film this in our tiny bathroom, the only room which we could black out completely. The talent was trying to look terrified, with me holding the laptop screen above his head so the flames would dance on his face, Ross crouching below to film and daughter 2 holding a branch of fir tree and waving it in the actor’s face as if moving with a breeze. After all that effort, Ross scrutinised the screen: ‘No – too dark.’ We tried again outside and in the kitchen. It would have to do. On to daughter 2’s dancing feet, and some lovely landscape shots of Loch Ness.

The rain had cleared up by then, leaving behind a moody layer of cloud and mist. Oh well. Some fiddle-scraping in a flowery field might give the summery impression we were after. Worth a try, anyway. As evening fell and the town emptied, the talent became a little more relaxed, and we were able to get some running shots in the old town, up and down the tiny patch of cobbles we had found in a lane and over an old Victorian footbridge. Good enough, Ross reckoned, and that was good enough for me. With the husband home from work and our stomachs full of pizzas, we headed for our final stop. What are the chances – the beautiful staircase in Eden Court’s Bishop Palace, normally accessible round the clock, was being used for a wedding! Noooo! I needed a nice old stair for my murder victim!

And no, we could not return the next day – we had today, and only today, before Ross-with-the-camera was off to Glasgow again!

The husband, reluctantly supportive, seemed relieved. ‘Oh well,’ he sighed, grinning out his relief and steering towards home.

‘No wait. One more try!’ I had heard of the beautiful staircase in the Royal Highland Hotel, although I had never seen it. ‘You’ll never get permission at this short notice,’ the husband argued, but he must have felt confident he was right – he pulled in by the station and I tried my charm offensive with the receptionist. I need’t have worried. No problem at all, apparently. Film away!

Image result for Royal Highland Hotel Inverness staircase

My husband’s grin quickly turned to a grimace when I told him that yes, I expected him to lie down, upside down, on a staircase in a tourist-crowded hotel lobby on a Friday night, and play dead. I still can’t help laughing pretty hysterically when I look back on it! The only thing still missing was a little footage of an old clock which Ross and I sneaked in on the way home just after 11 pm. A long, long day. Will it work? Who knows.

But for now, that’s a wrap!