February Writing Quote #15

Image result for Writing quote Kazuo Ishiguro

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Victorian Topic Teaching Resources: PUNCH

Well, the bicentenary of Queen Victoria’s birth is coming up in May 2019, and I thought I’d create some relevant teaching resources for Punch.

Featuring discussion questions on every chapter, and a wide range of activities based on and inspired by the text, with fun drama and interactive components, too. Check it out!

Teaching Resources Punch

 

BRAND-NEW FREE Kidlit Quiz for Teachers – with a Scottish Round!

Book Week Scotland is nearly upon us!kidlit quiz

TEACHERS!

Looking for an easy, ready-to-run kidlit quiz (PPT) with solutions (Word Doc)

It’s ideal for upper primary or even S1 and features questions on classic and contemporary children’s books, from picture books to motion picture adaptations.

This one has ten slides per round. I trialled it with 28 kids, split into groups of four. The full thing may take up to 1.5 or 2 hours, depending how much thinking time you allow. They really enjoyed it!

Here you go!

Kidlit Quiz 2018

Kidlit Quiz 2018 Solutions

How to run it:

  • A plain sheet with group name, round name and numbers down the side will suffice, and a clipboard definitely makes things easier.
  • I have found that kids stay most engaged if you give some answers throughout, rather than leaving a huge info-dump till the end. So, ask Rounds 1 and 2, offer answers/scores for Round 1, run Round 3, offer scores for Round 2 etc. But up to you really.
  • I think a break somewhere at the halfway stage helps!

 

 

Roll of the Dice Creative Writing

Hello again, teachers and writers!

clipdice

Use giant dice if you can! More fun that way.

How about a wee creative writing activity?

Ideal for #Literacy #CreativeWriting #authorvisits

‘I don’t know what to write about!’ If I got paid for every time I heard a pupil complain about lack of ideas, I’d be very rich indeed.

So how about turning the whole thing into a game? I had seen fiction squares in writing magazines before, Would this work in schools?

Yes, I can confirm! It definitely does. I’ve tried it!

Step 1: On a whiteboard, create a blank table:

Fiction Square step 1

Step 2: Get kids to shout out interesting suggestions and fill the table in.

Fiction Square 3

Step 3: Now comes the fun part. Get kids into pairs or groups and let them roll the dice twice for characters, twice for character traits and once each for a problem, an object and a location. I use a giant dice so the whole class can see.

Step 4: Give them 5-10 minutes to come up with a story incorporating these elements. I tend to allow them to ignore/discard whatever doesn’t fit their best idea – it’s about creating compelling stories, not contriving to squeeze the ingredients in at all cost. Remind pupils that the problem must be addressed and possibly overcome in the story. There must be an outcome. That will automatically result in a story arc.

Step 5: Once pupils have generated a story together, you could set them the individual task of drafting an exciting or intriguing opening for the story.  This can later be developed into a longer piece of writing. 

Have fun!

 

A Free Victorian Christmas Script

We all know Charles Dickens’ famous ‘A Christmas Carol’. Nothing beats a good ol’ Victorian Christmas, right?

Teachers!

Here is an instant, easy-to-use 3-page script adaptation which could not be simpler; you could do this in a day!

The flash-back and flash-forward sections are left open for devising. This allows flexibility to accommodate as many or as few pupils as you need, and it also means you can send a group of pupils off to sort out those scenes independently while you rehearse the main storyline with the others. Suitable P4 (keeping it simple) -S1 (with bells on). 

Feel free to print the document below – the original is old enough to have no copyright, and I adapted it myself, so no issues there. Enjoy!

445405

A Christmas Carol

The Ultimate Kidlit Quiz

Stuck for what to do with youngsters during #BookWeekScotland?

I devised this QUIZ (suitable for upper primary/lower secondary school) based on classic and recent children’s titles.

It takes around an hour and a half to run (it helps to have another adult in the room to help with marking!). From The Hungry Caterpillar to The Hunger Games, this quiz should be accessible to all, while still challenging the most devoted of bookworms! The quiz itself is in Powerpoint format, while the solutions are a simple Word document.

The Ultimate Kidlit Quiz

Ultimate Kidlit Quiz Solutions

There are eight rounds, with ten questions each.

I’d suggest handing each team of 4 pupils a sheet for each round. Get groups to think up a group name and nominate a scribe. After each round, collect them in and run through the answers (your helpers can mark the sheets) before issuing the paper for the next round. 

Have fun!

 

 

Free Stuff for Teachers (3) ‘Don’t Touch the Writ’ Game

 

Another Highland Clearances activity for teachers – this time it’s a game!

CaptureThe eviction writ was considered legally binding if villagers had been touched by the document.

In Fir for Luck, the villagers go to great lengths not to touch it – and manage to force the sheriff officer to burn the writ instead. ‘Mind, that writ was never served’ snaps one of the villagers as the servant of the law is sent on his way.

Split the class into two teams. It’s best played in a sports hall or outside, but a cleared area in the classroom may well be fine. Pupils should sit on chairs or benches opposite each other in two lines.

Place a bucket with a rolled up piece of paper in the middle of the two rows, with at least a couple of metres in between.

Number each team, but start the count at opposite sides so that, say, the number 10s on both sides are diagonally across from each other, with the bucket (containing the writ) between them.

game1

Now call out a number. The two pupils with that number will run to the middle, grab the writ and attempt to touch their opponent with it before he/she reaches their seat again. Discourage violence!!!

If successful, they gain a point for their team. If their opponent gets to the writ first and manages to touch them with it, the other team gets a point. Deduct points for not getting up at all.

Mix numbers up, and try to catch pupils out – that way it’s the most fun. Keep it fast-moving, taking care to always place the ‘writ’ back in the middle. I tend to play until the first team reaches 20 points or similar. Kids seem to really like this game.

It also works sitting on the floor, but ensure proper boundaries – in my experience there is a fair bit of bum-shuffling towards the writ! Not something the 18th century villagers would have done, I’m sure!